Entries from April 2010

Blog Log: 25 April 2010

Date April 26, 2010

Despite the showers we’ve been having on the mainland, our Sunday was not only fair and sunny, it was also, relatively silt-free! That translates to: The visibility was great! Well, it wasn’t as good as it gets, but we were pleasantly surprised when as we descended into the brightly-lit waters of Hantu today. The allied [...]

Blog Log: 17 April 2010

Date April 26, 2010

While I was away from Singapore, Hantu Blog volunteers didn’t stop at what they were passionate about; they continued to dive at Hantu with friends and strangers alike, educating them about the life on local reefs and taking some incredible pictures like the one above of an Aeolid feeding.

S.O.S. Files – A Journey to Sungai Pulai

Date April 26, 2010

S.O.S. stands for “save our Seahorses”, a non-profit group dedicated to saving the seahorse – a flagship creature is popularly known for. This marine handbook is a testament to to Sungai Pulai’s intriguing biodiversity, and the Hantu Blog is proud to have been able to contribute photos of marine life from Singapore for this effort! [...]

Birds of Pulau Hantu

Date April 2, 2010

I was told by a former resident of Hantu Island, that it got its name, which translates as “Ghost Island” in Malay, from of the calls of fishing owls that used to reside in the island’s mangrove trees several decades ago, before the island was manicured to its present state. The Malay name for owls [...]

Pea-sized False scorpionfish

Date April 2, 2010

False scorpionfish Centrogenys vaigiensis are commonly encountered on Singapore’s reefs. What tickled me about this particular encounter was that this particular individual must be the smallest of its species I have ever come across! Looking exactly like a miniature version of its adult counterparts, this tinsy fella squeezed itself at the base of a pink [...]

Tiny reef cuttlefish employs superb camouflage

Date April 2, 2010

Divers at Pulau Hantu encountered several reef cuttlefish last Sunday – from large rugby ball-sized reef monsters, to pinkie nail-sized critters like the one above, which were almost invisible. The large ones appear much more confident on the reef, keeping still when approached, seemingly unfazed by us curious divers. The smaller ones on the other [...]