Seahorse Bonanza

Date February 26, 2013

IMG_3160.jpg

A female Tigertail seahorse in a yellow phase. PHOTO: Khoo Min Hui/Hantu Blog

It’s been two weeks in a row that divers that spotted several seahorses making their presence known along various parts of the reef. So it may well be an indication that spring has arrived at Pulau Hantu!

IMG_3134.jpg

A male Tigertail seahorse with a bloated pouch. It might have inflated it with water to indicate to females that it's receptive, or it might have already received a transfer of eggs from a female. PHOTO: Khoo Min Hui/Hantu Blog

The seahorses appeared to like clinging onto sponges. I wonder if it’s just because it’s a convenient place to hold on to, or if there is another reason why they cling onto sponges.

IMG_3124.jpg

PHOTO: Khoo Min Hui/Hantu Blog

Some of the seahorses were tucked away deep inside crevices within the reef! Divers did a really good job of spotting those ones!

IMG_3128.jpg

PHOTO: Khoo Min Hui/Hantu Blog

Also hiding in crevices were Striped fangblennies. This one has made a convenient home in the bottle neck of a discarded glass bottle that has become encrusted with coral!

IMG_3157.jpg

PHOTO: Khoo Min Hui/Hantu Blog

A young Winged pipefish it well camouflaged along the reef, with appendages sticking out of its body that mimic the appearance of coralline algae. We seem to often see the juveniles but it has been a really long time since we saw an adult. I’m not sure if it’s because the adults get preyed on by other carnivores on the reef, or do the adults go somewhere else?

IMG_3147.jpg

PHOTO: Khoo Min Hui/Hantu Blog

Other hidden critters divers managed to spot included this commensal shrimp on a red-colored Gorgonian coral.

IMG_3150.jpg

PHOTO: Khoo Min Hui/Hantu Blog

A False scorpion fish seems almost invisible, hiding amidst the coral rubble.

IMG_3154.jpg

PHOTO: Khoo Min Hui/Hantu Blog

A Noble volute trawls the seabed for an unsuspecting victim!

IMG_3118.jpgIMG_3121.jpgIMG_3136.jpgIMG_3153.jpg
There were also plenty of beautiful nudibranches! Clockwise from top left: Phyllidia occellata, Glossodoris atromarginata, Hypselodoris emma and Glossodoria cinta.

Flatworm

PHOTO: ┬ęToh Chay Hoon

Chay Hoon also spotted this psychedelic flatworm!

To see more photos from this dive, visit the Gallery!

Leave a Reply

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>